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Construction starts on record breaking UHVDC transmission lines in China

Two ultra high voltage power transmission lines will have world’s largest capacity and be used for China's wind and hydropower developments

The UHVDC transmission lines will be used for hydropower developments in China
The UHVDC transmission lines will be used for hydropower developments in China

Construction has started in China on two ultra-high voltage power transmission lines, according to reports. The two transmission lines are designed with the world's largest power capacity and will be used to for wind and hydro energy developments across the country.

The first 800kv ultra-high voltage direct current (UHVDC) transmission line is being constructed in China's far western Xinjiang region and will be used to transmit wind energy in the area. 

The transmission line starts at the energy base of Hami prefecture in eastern Xinjiang and ends at a converter station at the central city of Zhengzhou, according to the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC), the project contractor. It waves its way through Xinjiang, Gansu, Shaanxi, Ningxia, Shanxi and Henan provinces.

The 2210.2km DC line has a voltage level of 800 kV and rated transmission capacity of 8 GW.

The SGCC said: “This project will help make full use of wind power resources in Hami and consequently promote the wind power development in the Hami energy base.”

Meanwhile, another 800kV UHV DC line is being constructed that will make use of hydro power developments in China.

The transmission line starts from the Sichuan Shuanglong converter station and ends at the Western Zhejiang converter station, passing through the five provinces of Sichuan, Guizhou, Hunan, Jiangxi and Zhejiang.

The 1679.9-km DC line has a voltage level of 800 kV and rated transmission capacity of 8 GW. The project will send hydropower from western China to the load centres in eastern China, promoting the hydropower development in the western regions and the optimised allocation of clean energy resources in a larger scope.

The SGCC said: “The project has the potential of finally concretising two long-expected goals: one is to bridge the development gap between regions in China, and the other is to relieve land and environmental pressures in the load regions.”